Blog: 2016

22 Dec 2016

Year end 2016

Webmaster

Thanks for your support in 2016 and happy new year.

For the next week I’ll be doing year-end stuff like inventory and accounting. I’m also planning some downtime and will finish out the year with a couple sweet rides. The shop never closes and will happily take your orders but they won’t hit the post office until January 3.

My final offer

If you’re thinking about a wheelset project, let me throw in a little incentive: order any pair of White Industries or Paul Component hubs and receive a 10% store credit for spokes. Not enough? We’ll pay the tax on your hubs. Want to take advantage of this offer in conjunction with wheelbuilding instead? Ok. For pricing, see each manufacturer’s website. Convert USD pricing to Canadian dollars by adding 29.7% but assume free shipping and all taxes included.

Email me before 2017 to get this deal rolling.

16 Dec 2016

Use the Sapim Force

Webmaster

I added Sapim Force spokes to the spoke weight calculator.

Sapim Force spokes are triple-butted 2.2/1.8/2.0mm. This is very similar to Sapim Race (identical stiffness) but with more material on the vulnerable elbow section. I like Force for touring, heavier riders, and to reduce risk of elbow breakage. As we can see the weight penalty is very small.

01 Nov 2016

Fancy carbon

Webmaster

It was a pleasure building these fancy WTB CI31 rims to DT Swiss 350 hubs. Normally I find myself building China-direct carbon rims but the brand name stuff is great too.

06 Oct 2016

Campagnolo factory wheels

Webmaster

If anyone is interested in Campagnolo factory wheels, please let me give you a quote. The advantage of buying your Campy wheels here is my personal inspection and tuning as needed plus get free shipping anywhere in Canada. Don’t assume spoke tension is perfect, let me check it and supply a graph so you know. Only Campagnolo wheels bought in Canada are eligible for warranty service in Canada.

10 Sep 2016

Mitigating spoke windup

Webmaster

One challenge a wheelbuilder faces is managing spoke windup. Windup happens when friction between spoke and nipple causes the spoke to twist instead of tighten. This is bad because a twisted spoke is not in equilibrium and will eventually unwind. When twisted spokes unwind, wheels lose alignment. Windup worsens as spoke diameter decreases, which makes thin spokes like DT Revolutions more difficult (thicker spokes build more easily). The problem worsens as tension increases, which is a bigger issue in the 11-speed era because higher tensions are typically required.

There are a few strategies for dealing with spoke windup. The first and most fundamental is to make sure nipples receive ample lubrication. Sometimes adding more lubrication during a build helps. The second strategy is to detect spoke windup and compensate. Windup can be detected by feeling the spoke rotate in tandem with turns of the nipple (a flag can be fixed to the spoke to provide a visual cue). When you start experiencing spoke windup, it’s helpful to overturn the nipple and then back off. For example to achieve a quarter turn of the nipple, tighten the nipple a half turn then loosen by a quarter turn. Windup is released during the loosening step.

Before a wheel is declared complete it should be free of windup. Windup can be freed by flexing spokes in different ways. One way is to grab roughly parallel pairs of same-side spokes and pull them together. Another more drastic way is to put the wheel on the ground, touch the ground with the hub and press down around the rim. You can often hear pinging noises as spokes unwind. A wheel is complete when these procedures do not change the wheel and other tolerances are met.

Now you know and knowing is 90% of success. Happy wheelbuilding!