24 Dec 2019

See you next year

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SpokeService is now closed for 2019. I’ll be taking the remainder of the year to clean the workshop, overhaul tools, count inventory and close the books. The online shop will remain open but orders won’t ship until operations resume in January. The site will have a little downtime for server upgrades, which means my free software utilities may be unavailable for short periods.

Looking forward

Growth in 2019 was positive but below expectations. The upside of available hours was time to work on my digital truing stand, now reaching maturity. I’ve manufactured a few units that I hope to share with beta testers in early 2020. More information coming to this blog in the near future.

Happy holidays and tailwinds in 2020.

20 Dec 2019

Morizumi mounting

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Ric from Wheel Fanatyk visited recently and wrote about it on his blog. He was interested in my Morizumi setup and maybe others will be too. I’ll leave a few notes and build photos here. Read more →

13 Oct 2019

Building as always

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Wheelbuilds continue to trickle through the shop. Here’s a few snaps of recent builds:

25 Jul 2019

Tension graphing news

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A couple of changes to the spoke tension visualizer went live recently. The first is the Print setup button. It allows you to enable or disable parts of the screen for printing purposes. This includes the title, deflection readings, legend and the graph itself. Now would be a good time to remind users you can edit the title. Click or tap on the title and change the text to describe the job at hand. If you see other headers or footers, they’re added by your browser and can be suppressed with browser settings. Printing or saving to PDF is the most foolproof method of storing your work.

The second change is the Snapshot button. This clones your work into a new tab as a readonly copy. Users might find this useful for charting tension balance as work progresses. A subtle impact of this change is, for the first time, inputs can be saved as a URL — the address bar of the snapshot has the ones and zeros. Loading this address brings you back to the viewer with settings, readings and graph intact. As usual hovering the mouse over points on the graph shows exact tension values. There’s no need to make an account, no need to store anything in the cloud or anything like that.

Users are invited to share bug reports and browser compatibility issues. I also appreciate feature requests. They may not see the light of day right away but it helps shape my priorities when there’s time for development. If you’d like support for another tensiometer, please see here.

04 Jul 2019

Paul track build

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For singlespeed wheels I like hubs from Paul Component Engineering and Phil Wood. I can suggest which are best for you and offer competitive pricing — please email.

This wheelset uses Paul Component track hubs laced to Stan’s Alpha 400 tubeless rims with Sapim Laser spokes and alloy nipples. Total weight is 1545g. Additionally this wheelset is getting tamper-proof torx bolts for a little extra lockup security. The bolts are a Paul upgrade option.

Easy rim, hard rim

This wheelset was an interesting study in the difference a rim makes. My runout target with machined rims is 0.25mm (with the expectation they’ll settle in to 0.33mm over the long haul). This wasn’t achievable on the rear rim, which finished at 0.26mm. I spent quite a lot of time getting it this good and the rim made it clear I could go no further. After improving the most extreme misalignment the rim would fold some other way for no net improvement. The distortion didn’t seem related to the weld area nor expressed in locations 180 degrees apart. Even so by industry quality thresholds of 0.50mm runout and ±20% tension variation, this is still a very good wheel. The penalty associated with less-than-perfect rims is mostly wheelbuilding benchtime. Indeed the front wheel was completed in half the time with better alignment and lower tension variance.